Spring 2007
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Spring -2007

Secretary’s Corner

Winter has come and gone …. bad weather for some, not-so-bad for others. Spring seems to finally be here after a few false starts; and, with it, our thoughts turn to the fact …..IT’S LESS THAN 6 MONTHS TO THE NEWPORT REUNION!!!  If you haven’t done so already, SIGN UP NOW …. more about that later on.

1778 - John Paul Jones, while commanding the American vessel Ranger, receives the first official salute to the U.S. Stars and Stripes flag by a European country, at Quiberon, France.
1804 - Lt. Stephen Decatur
, with volunteers from frigate Constitution and schooner Enterprise, enters Tripoli Harbor by night in the ketch Intrepid to destroy the captured frigate Philadelphia. Decatur succeeds without American losses.
1813 - USS Essex
becomes first U.S. warship to round Cape Horn and enter the Pacific Ocean.
1814 - USS Constitution
captures the British ships Lovely Ann and Pictou.
1840 - Officers from USS Vincennes
make the first landing in Antarctica on floating ice.

Pete Maytham

Good & Humorous Thoughts

LITTLE KNOWN MARITIME FACTS -
A number of primary schools in a school district were doing a project on "The Sea." The children were asked to draw pictures or write about their experiences. Teachers then got together to compare results and put together some of the “better” ones. Here are a few of the more humorous (and risqué) ones:

  1. This is a picture of an octopus. It has eight testicles.  (Kelly, age 6)

  2. Some fish are dangerous. Jellyfish can sting. Electric eels can give you a shock. They have to live in caves under the sea where I think they have to plug themselves to chargers. (Christopher, age 7)

  3. Oysters' balls are called pearls. (James, age 6)

  4. If you are surrounded by sea you are an island . If you don't have sea all around you, you are in continent. (Wayne, age 7)

  5. I think sharks are ugly and mean, and have big teeth, just like Emily Richardson. She's not my friend no more. (Kylie, age 6)

  6. A dolphin breathes through an asshole on the top of its head. (Billy, age 8)

  7. My uncle goes out in his boat with pots, and comes back with crabs. (Millie, age 6)

  8. When ships had sails, they used to use the trade winds to cross the ocean. Sometimes, when the wind didn't blow, the sailors would whistle to make the wind come. My brother said they would be better off eating beans. (William, age 7)

  9. I like mermaids. They are beautiful, and I like their shiny tails. How do mermaids get pregnant? (Helen, age 6)

  10. When you go swimming in the sea, it is very cold, and it makes my willy shrink. (Kevin, age 6)

************************************************************

NAVY vs MARINES -
An old Submarine Navy Chief and an old Marine Gunny were sitting at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Club arguing about who'd had the tougher career.

"I did 30 years in the Corps," the Marine declared proudly, "and fought in three of my country's wars. Fresh out of boot camp I hit the beach at Okinawa, clawed my way up the blood-soaked sand, and eventually took out an entire enemy machine-gun nest with a single grenade.

As a sergeant, I fought in Korea alongside Chesty Puller, pushed the enemy inch by bloody inch all the way up to the Chinese border, always under a barrage of artillery and small arms fire.

Finally, as a gunny sergeant, I did three consecutive combat tours in Vietnam. We humped through the mud and razor grass for 14 hours a day, plagued by rain and mosquitoes, ducking under sniper fire by day and mortar fire all night. In a firefight, we’d fire until our arms ached and our guns were empty, then we charge the enemy with bayonets”.

“Ah,” said the Navy Chief with a dismissive wave of his hand. “Lucky bastard, all shore duty, huh?”

CO’s Column
DDG-53

Because of exercises at sea last fall restricting communications, CDR Jim Housinger was unable to transmit his usual input for the Fall issue of the newsletter. To make up for this, he’s prepared two parts covering more than 9 months of the ship’s operations. The ship deployed April 2, 2007 and is now sailing in harm’s way.

Part I (Jul. – Dec. 2006) –
Season’s Greetings to the JOHN PAUL JONES Family everywhere.

I’m writing this as we near the conclusion of our Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) with the NIMITZ Carrier Strike Group.  We’ve been underway for the past 20 days conducting integrated training with the Strike Group, exercising every warfare area in a live environment.  JOHN PAUL JONES continues to excel, being tasked on several occasions to assume high risk missions independently, and at other times to provide defense for the entire group.  Your shipmates aboard JPJ have performed admirably.

I’ll recap some of our story since July.

We had our Unit Level Training and Readiness Assessment-Engineering (ULTRA-E), starting the the 5th of July.   This is an engineering assessment, but of course involved everyone on the ship in some way.  We were able to certify our Main Space Firefighting capability during the assessment, which was a big hurdle, and certifying on the first try was a big deal.  We were also able to certify both Undersea Warfare teams early.  We completed our navigation certification by conducting a night harbor navigation package which included low visibility, loss of gyrocompass, and navigation of a swept mine channel.  The inspectors were so impressed they actually left to start writing the report well before the exercise was completed.  We were subjected to a night small-boat attack at anchor for training purposes, responding to multi-axis threats from high-speed vessels with 100% success in defending the ship, thus completing our Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection certification.  We completed our “Helo Day,” with multiple landings and take-offs, vertical replenishment, in-flight refueling, and on-deck refueling to complete our Air certification as well.   Lastly, we completed a towing exercise (JPJ towed another vessel) and moored to a buoy, a couple of real seamanship exercises that went exceedingly well.

We embarked 6 different groups of midshipmen from all around the country for their “Surface Week” training during their 3rd class summer cruises.  Besides two days of underway time for each group (which involved a lot of small boat transfers), we also assigned officers ashore to take the midshipmen through ship handling simulators, firefighting school, and Naval Coastal Warfare demonstrations.  It was a fast-paced time for them, but they all learned a great deal from the greatest group of Sailors in the Navy. In addition to all this, we also served as the Opposition Force for the BOXER Expeditionary Strike Group during their COMPTUEX.  JOHN PAUL JONES provided realistic threat maneuvers and communications to aid the Strike Group in their training in preparation for deployment.  In case you were wondering, yes, we also used some trickery against them to flex their responses.

During August we were able to complete the remainder of our training objectives for all mission areas.  We were extremely successful in our Search and Rescue (SAR) Certification.  The administrative, materiel, and training sides of the program were outstanding and our team performed both a shipboard recovery and a small boat recovery of a man overboard superbly.   We also completed more Engineering training weeks, including the “Go/No-go” week from 21-25 August.  This week required the teams to perform at a level far exceeding the certification requirements, so that we could have a reasonable assurance they would pass the certification.  We achieved “Go” status very quickly.  We also had our Group Commander’s Training (GCT) in August.   GCT involves every command in the NIMITZ Carrier Strike Group, exercising our ability to plan and execute warfare in a simulated but very plausible situation.  The Air Wing, the Carrier, Surface Ships, and Submarines all participated at the Fleet’s tactical integration facility on Pt. Loma.  Additionally, we had a group of civilians fly out to the ship later in the month for the Leaders to Sea program.  These people from various corporations and other businesses were able to get a glimpse of the finest crew in the Navy.   Several of them sent emails to Commander, Naval Surface Force, Pacific singing the praises of the fantastic people they saw as the ship operated underway for a day.

The day after Labor Day we got underway to do the last preparations for our Engineering Operations Certification (EOC).  Everything was running smoothly, our watchteams were ready to go, and the spaces were ready to train.  We sent our RHIB (small boat) in to San Diego to pick up the inspection team at 0530 on the day of the inspection.  At approximately 0550, a circuit breaker in our #1 electrical distribution switchboard catastrophically failed and caused an electrical fire within the switchboard.  The good news is, no one was injured and our engineers responded to the casualty in a superb manner (goes to show you we were ready for the inspection).  The bad news is that it took 2 weeks pierside to repair the switchboard, so we were unable to execute our EOC that day.  We rescheduled EOC for the week of October 16th.  In case you were wondering, no, the electrical fire was not the result of anything we were doing at the time.  The circuit breaker just failed at a very inopportune time (10 hours later, we would have likely been done with EOC).  Also, to give you some perspective on size, this was a 4000 amp breaker…a very large one.

Despite the problem described above, we pressed on the next week conducting our Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) on schedule.  It was a resounding success, and JOHN PAUL JONES became considered “Surge Capable”, meaning that we were certified to be deployed world-wide in an emergency.  We also continued the next week with the first of our Strike Group synthetic training events.  We used data links and artificial radar and sonar contacts to work in port with all ships in the NIMITZ Strike Group linked together in a simulated situation overseas. This sort of training is valuable, in that we can work through many issues without having to get the ships underway.   We also overlapped a couple of weeks in September with a two-week maintenance period.  We got a lot of needed work done in that time, including the resurfacing of major portions of our weather decks.  The new deck surfaces, refurbished air intake louvers, and new valves that were installed during this short period will increase our combat readiness and extend the life of the ship.   On the last day of September, we participated in the San Diego Sea and Air Parade.  JPJ was showcased to thousands of spectators lining the shores of San Diego Bay with the crew manning the rail in whites.  We could see the pride and admiration in the faces of the people ashore as they saw your dedicated Sailors and this magnificent ship.

We started the month of October in the NIMITZ Carrier Strike Group “Group Sail”.   Group Sail was a great time for us to train at sea with the other ships and aircraft that will be deploying with us next year.  Upon completion of the Group Sail, we participated in the San Francisco Fleet Week Parade of Ships, as we entered San Francisco bay on a beautiful morning.  Your Sailors got to enjoy the sights, sounds, and feel of San Francisco for a few days.  Some of the activity included trips to Alcatraz, golf, hosted lunch and dinner events, and tickets to the 49rs/Raiders football game (some crewmembers unfurled a massive American flag on the field prior to the game).  As ambassadors of goodwill, JPJ visited a senior center and helped serve meals, as well as visit the people living there to share some stories.  We also had several hundred visitors aboard during two days of general public visiting.  Security was extremely tight, which caused some long lines, but people just kept coming to see JPJ.  Upon departure from San Francisco, we had our Tigers aboard for the Tiger Cruise back to San Diego.  It was a treat to have them aboard so family members and friends could observe the crew in action during a couple of typical days at sea, which included live small caliber weapons firing (.50 caliber machine guns, M-60 machine guns, 9mm pistols, 12 ga. Shotguns, and M-16 rifles), an underway replenishment alongside USNS GUADALUPE, rides in the ship’s Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIB), a General Quarters Drill with simulated missile and boat attacks plus damage to the ship, plus some fun with game and movie nights.  On 13 October, some of you were here for our Friends and Family Day Cruise.  Despite some rather ominous looking skies early in the morning, we only had about 4 minutes of light rain as we headed out of San Diego and it turned out to be a fabulous sunny day.  We got to fire our 5” gun and Close-in-Weapon-System, do some high-speed maneuvers, conduct a re-enlistment, demonstrate some damage control techniques for the younger crowd, do some knot tying, show our Visit Boarding Search and Seizure equipment, and demonstrate a flight deck helicopter crash response.  Most of all, it was a good time for people to see the ocean and San Diego from the decks of the finest ship in the Navy.  That day as well, we were presented with a check from the JOHN PAUL JONES Association to cover the costs of our newest acquisition: a replica of a uniform worn by John Paul Jones himself.  We now have an officer wear the uniform for special occasions such as underway replenishments, pulling into new ports, or when special visitors come aboard.  It is a huge hit with the crew and all visitors.  The wardroom originally purchased the uniform, but with the generosity of the JPJ Association, we were reimbursed and the uniform will stay with the ship until she is decommissioned.  We also received a generous donation to our MWR fund.  The crew is grateful for your kindness.

The following week we got underway for our rescheduled Engineering Operations Certification.  The inspectors came aboard just before 7 am via our RHIB, we briefed them on our drills and they performed the required safety walkthrough of our engineering plant.  They found an extremely low number of discrepancies, so few that we were able to jump straight into our evolution and drill sets.  We completed both watch sections and earned a score of “above average”.   This great performance was a testament to our sustained level of training, since you might recall our switchboard fire in September delayed our EOC.

We completed the month and rolled into November with another maintenance availability, getting some more much-needed work done.  We also had a change of leadership in November, as our former DESRON 23 Commodore, Mike Smith, was relieved by Commodore Adam Levitt on the 10th.   We hosted a dinner in the wardroom for all the squadron Commanding Officers and their wives as well as the incoming and outgoing Commodores.  It was by far the best dinner event I’ve seen in my career.  The guests likened it to dining in a 5-star restaurant.  Our Supply department outdid themselves that evening.  We completed our Joint Fleet Synthetic Trainer with the entire NIMITZ Carrier Strike Group in the middle of the month.  This provided some great training for our combat team to work with the other Strike Group elements as well other services and multinational forces while pierside.   We had a very successful holiday party on November 16th with over 260 attendees.  Our Morale Welfare and Recreation Committee did a superb job with the party and it lasted from 6:00pm until midnight.

As we ended November, we made a stop to on load some ammunition at North Island, then proceeded out for our COMPTUEX, which is where I started this letter.

Of note, we recently learned we earned the Golden Anchor award for retention for the second year in a row.  We’re keeping our country’s finest in the Navy.  We also advanced 33 Sailors to E4, E5, and E6.  That’s well over 10% of the crew getting advanced from the September examination cycle. Our advancement percentage exceeded the Navy average in each category, proving once again, that the BEST and BRIGHTEST reside in DDG 53.

I wish you all a joyous and happy holiday season.  Merry Christmas!

Sincerely and Very Respectfully,
James J. Housinger
CDR               USN

Part II (Dec. 2006 – Apr. 2007) –
December was a busy, but incredibly productive month for JOHN PAUL JONES.  Just as November ended with us in our Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) with the rest of the NIMITZ Strike Group, December saw it continue.  We completed a 23 day underway period just before Christmas.  Interestingly, that’s the longest JPJ has been underway in over two years (the ship didn’t even spend that long underway during the last deployment).

During COMPTUEX, we brought our readiness ratings up to the top in all mission areas.  We completed numerous certifications that take place only every two years.  We conducted training missions from seamanship exercises, to complex defense of fixed sites, to ballistic missile defense, to Tomahawk missile strikes, Air Defense, Undersea Warfare, escort missions of high-value merchant and research vessels against a determined enemy, Visit Boarding Search and Seizure exercises aboard other vessels under unfavorable weather conditions, and many many more events too numerous to list.  Many of the things I listed above were done multiple times during the underway period.  We had several days of poor sea conditions, with swells in excess of 13 feet.  To say the least, that made it challenging to get everything complete, yet we did.

We started the new year with a great win for USC in the Rose Bowl (just had to put in a plug there, and besides, I and several people from the ship attended).

A couple of days later, we recalled the majority of the crew as a drill to test our readiness to respond on short notice to world events.  We were able to meet the tasking and have the ship fully ready to get underway and perform our assigned missions well ahead of schedule.  This was a true testament to the ability and dedication of JOHN PAUL JONES Sailors.  It also shows that no matter what the tasking, your Sailors are prepared to go In Harm’s Way at any time.

After the installation of some new systems, and the training that goes along with that, we set sail in mid-month for Mazatlan, Mexico.  Though the main purpose of the trip was to have fun and maintain good relations with the Mexican people and government, we took advantage of the time at sea heading south as well as north to conduct some intensive unit level training.

Mazatlan was a bit cooler and windier than expected upon arrival, and only one day had abundant sunshine and warm weather, yet even with that, just about everyone found many ways to enjoy the new environment.  Our time in port was 4 days well-spent and most of us will remember the visit for years to come. While in port we also conducted extensive planning for an exercise with a ship of the Mexican Navy.  On our departure, we rendezvoused with the Mexican ship ARM BRAVO, and conducted maneuvering, gunfire, and signaling drills to enhance our ability to work together in the future.  Again, we conducted numerous training exercises on the way home, including deck landing qualifications for helicopters.

Having just returned on Friday afternoon, we then hosted an extremely high-level engagement visit with a delegation from the People’s Republic of China, including their equivalent of the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (the number 2 military officer in China).  The crew prepared the ship for the visit, and presented it in what is now typical JOHN PAUL JONES style.  Our guests walked away with a sense of the true character of the men and women serving here.

February was another busy month.  We opened up by conducting our Ballistic Missile Defense Tactical Operations certification with the newest program and equipment in the Fleet.  This was a huge effort in a mission area where our Nation has a limited number of assets.  JOHN PAUL JONES is a critical part of the Ballistic Missile Defense structure that involves Army, Navy, and Air Force systems.

During the first full week of the month, we conducted two days of ammunition onloads at North Island.  The purpose was to load our final ammunition for deployment, as well as switch out some ordnance that was due to expire prior to the end of deployment.

We then conducted our Unit Level Training and Readiness Assessment-Sustainment (or ULTRA-S) , a three-day assessment of every aspect of the ships administrative and tactical readiness in all areas, both in port and at sea, demonstrating our mastery of how to do things right.  The assessment was a resounding success.  We executed the demanding schedule flawlessly, pointed out by the assessment team as well as our higher chain-of-command.  Our measures of effectiveness were right in line with the assessors’.  In fact, in over 50% of the areas assessed, though the disparities were minimal, we assessed ourselves at a lower level than the outside assessors.  What’s that tell you?  It tells you we have a very effective program of self-assessment and our training team members are capable of spotting weaknesses in our watchteams, which helps us to always train at a higher level.

The following week’s concentration was our Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection assessment in conjunction with the NIMITZ Carrier Strike Group Force Protection Exercise.  This involved three days of realistic scenarios thrown against our in port duty sections to observe our ability to protect the ship, our people, and the other ships in the Strike Group.  The problems ranged from our teams detecting people conducting surveillance of the ships from shore or small boats, to suicide bombers, to riot control.  The problems were realistically presented by the Fleet Commander, with pyrotechnics for bomb explosions, actors hired to simulate mass casualties on the pier, and cunning people trying to gain unauthorized access to the ship.  We were successful in thwarting all their efforts, and learned a lot that will help us to be even more secure overseas.

The day following the Force Protection Exercise, we got underway bright and early for our Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX).  This was our final advanced exercise for the Carrier Strike Group, about a week and a half long intense exercise designed to flex our ability to work as a Strike Group at the highest levels of proficiency.  In other words, it was the graduation exam for the Strike Group.

We entered March completing the last few days of JTFEX.  JTFEX was a success and marked the end of our formal training cycle.  The NIMITZ Carrier Strike Group emerged certified for Major Combat Operations.  We returned to San Diego from JTFEX a day early because we accomplished all of our objectives a full day ahead of schedule.

Upon return, we started our first of two pre-overseas movement (POM) leave periods.  With our “turnover day” on March 19th, the second POM leave period began.  As we emerged from the second POM leave period on March 30th, everyone returned for one last workday prior to deploying on April 2nd.

Thus ends a recap of our latest work.  Everyday, your shipmates aboard JOHN PAUL JONES (DDG 53) are doing their best to maintain the superb reputation of this ship and the JPJ ships of the past.

Sincerely and Very Respectfully,

James J. Housinger
Commander, U.S. Navy
Commanding Officer

Newport, RI Reunion
(9-12 Nov. 2007)

DEAR SHIPMATES,
IT IS NOT TOO LATE TO SIGN UP FOR THE NOVEMBER REUNION OVER VETERAN’S DAY WEEKEND, BEGINNING FRIDAY 9 NOVEMBER AND DEPARTING MONDAY MORNING THE 12TH.  THE COST OF $135 PER PERSON INCLUDES A FABULOUS HOSPITALITY SUITE, TWO BREAKFASTS, A BANQUET AT THE U.S. NAVAL WAR COLLEGE AND A LOBSTERFEST OVERLOOKING (BUT NOT IN) THE POUNDING SURF OF FIRST BEACH.
CALL (860) 572-0899 OR E-MAIL ME AT ejettinger@snet.net FOR MORE DETAILS.
WE ARE ARRANGING A SELF-GUIDED TOUR OF BATTLESHIP COVE IN FALL RIVER ON SATURDAY AND A TOUR OF NEWPORT AND A COUPLE OF MANSIONS ON SUNDAY FOR THOSE WANTING TO LEAVE THE HOSPITALITY SUITE FOR SOME FRESH AIR. THE LIST OF THOSE WHO HAVE ALREADY ENLISTED OR ARE STANDING ON THE BROW:

AGNEW, ARTZER, BRUCE, BURNS, CAHER, CALANDRA, COLE,  DIAMOND(DD-230), COLELLA, COMISKEY, EFFLAND, ETTINGER, GALLAGHER, GORE, GORGONE , GROVE, HALL, HILDEBRAND, HOUSINGER, KELLY, KNAUL, KREITNER, LOMBARDO, LONGO, LUNDGREN,  MALAKANICH, MALZAHN, MAYTHAM, MCKECHNIE, MCNAMARA, MINER, MOORE, OLSEN, PAWSKI,  PIERSON (MRS. GRADY DD-230), RICHARDSON,  RIGGS, SCHAEFFER, SCOLLARD, SCZCPINSKI, TAVAGLIONE, THOMPSON, TOWER, WAGER, WALL, WEISER, WILLIAMS, WYLER, ZEISSER.
 
(I CANNOT ATTEST TO THE ACCURACY OF THIS LIST.  IF YOU ARE ON IT AND HAVE NOT REGISTERED, SEND YOUR CHECK TO JOHN MCKECHNIE.  IF YOU ARE NOT ON IT GIVE ME A CALL.  IF YOU KNOW SOMEONE FROM THE OLD DAYS THAT SHOULD BE ON IT LET THEM KNOW THAT THEY ARE AWOL)
THIS IS SHAPING UP TO BE A GREAT EVENT AND NEWPORT IS IN ITS GLORY DAYS.
ANDY, BILL, GEORGE AND I LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU ALL.
ED ETTINGER

DATES:
VENUE:
NOVEMBER 9-12, 2007
MAINSTAY INN/BEST WESTERN
151 ADMIRAL KALBFUS RD.  NEWPORT, RI  02840
(401) 849-9880  www.bestwestern.com/themainstayinn

§ ROOM RATES - FRI/SAT $69 PER NIGHT, SUN $55.50 INCL.TAXES
§ PRICES HOLD ONE WEEK BEFORE AND ONE WEEK AFTER REUNION
§ BE SURE TO MENTION JPJ REUNION WHEN BOOKING
KEY EVENTS: FRI 9th CHECK IN * HOSPITALITY SUITE OPENS AT 1600
SAT 10th BREAKFAST MAINSTAY INN * HOSPITALITY SUITE *
1700 LOBSTER/CLAM BAKE
SUN 11th HOSPITALITY SUITE * 1700 DEPART FOR MEMORIAL SERVICE AND BANQUET AT THE NAVY BASE 0’CLUB
MON 12th 0800 BREAKFAST & BUSINESS MEETING * CHECKOUT

§  THE COST OF THE REUNION HAS BEEN FIXED AT $135 PER PERSON WITH BANQUET, LOBSTER/CLAM BAKE, TWO BREAKFASTS AND OPEN-BAR HOSPITALITY ROOM INCLUDED

§  GROUP TOURS WILL BE “a la carte.”  TOURS OF NEWPORT’S GRAND HOMES www.newportmansions.org AND/OR THE DESTROYER MUSEUM IN FALL RIVER www.battleshipcove.org CAN BE ARRANGED IF THERE IS ENOUGH INTEREST.  A BUS TOUR TO BATTLESHIP COVE (SATURDAY ONLY) WILL COST ABOUT $28-$30 P/P AND NEWPORT/MANSION TOURS (SATURDAY AND SUNDAY) RANGE FROM $10 TO $31 P/P DEPENDING ON SELECTION AND OUR GROUP’S SIZE.

§  MOST CONVENIENT AIRPORT IS GREEN IN PROVIDENCE www.pvdairport.com SERVING AA, CONTINENTAL, SOUTHWEST, DELTA, UNITED, US AIRWAYS, ETC.  SHUTTLE FROM GREEN TO NEWPORT www.cozytrans.com.  ONE-WAY COST PER PERSON IS CURRENTLY $20.

§ IT IS NOT TOO EARLY TO BOOK YOUR ROOM - ?  CALL - (401) 849-9880  .

WE URGE YOU TO LET US KNOW IF YOU PLAN TO COME AND TO MAIL THE REUNION FEE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.  OUR LOBSTER/CLAM BAKE VENUE CAPACITY HAS LIMITS.  AND TO HELP US PLAN, PLEASE TAKE A MOMENT NOW TO LET ME KNOW BY RETURN MAIL, FAX OR EMAIL WHETHER OR NOT YOU PLAN TO ATTEND.

 

     

DEFINITELY WILL ATTEND

 

PROBABLY WILL ATTEND; NO. IN PARTY ____

 

SORRY, I WILL NOT BE ABLE TO ATTEND

 

 

YES, I’M INTERESTED IN TOURS

 

BATTLESHIP COVE

 

MANSIONS

 

 

I PLAN TO HAVE A CAR WHILE IN NEWPORT

 

Send your reply to:  Ed Ettinger, 174 Cedar Rd., Mystic , CT 06355 Tel: (860) 572-0899; Fax: (860) 536-2865, E-Mail: ejettinger@snet.net

*********************Registration Form - Cut Here********************

USS JOHN PAUL JONES ASSN ‘07 REUNION
NEWPORT IN NOVEMBER
(AND WE DON’T MEAN NEWPORT BEACH)
REUNION REGISTRATION AND NAME BADGE INFO

Please send this form and your check for $135.00 per person attending as soon as possible.  MAIL TO:

USS JOHN PAUL JONES ASSOCIATION
C/O John McKechnie, Treasurer
540 Alameda Blvd.
Coronado, CA 92118-1617

This Registration Fee covers the cost of the Banquet, Lobster/Clam Bake, two Breakfasts, and Hospitality Suite beverages and expenses.

Check One:

 

DD230

 

DD932

 

DDG32

 

DDG53

 Your First Name: ________________ Last Name: _________________________________
Only if attending: Spouse/Other: First Name   ______________Last Name ______________
Street Address:   _____________________________________________________________
City, State, Zip:   _____________________________________________________________
Work Phone:   __________________________Home Phone:  _________________________
E-mail:            ________________________
Is name badge name different from above?  If so, indicate ____________________________
Years served on JPJ: From:  _____ to _____  Rank/Rate on JPJ:  ______  Final R/R_______

 

Yes, I’m interested in tours.  Please send me details and final costs.

 

 

 

BATTLESHIP COVE

 

MANSIONS

 

OTHER __________________

                 

 

I plan to have a car while in Newport.

 

At the Lobster/Clam Bake I prefer steak.

 

Self

 

Spouse/Other

 

I plan to arrive on: ____________ Mode of transportation ___________________

 

Do you have a food allergy or physical disability of which we should aware?  ___

 

SEE YOU IN  NEWPORT !!!