Summer 2006
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Summer – 2006

Secretary’s Column

Hope you’re all enjoying a pleasant summer ….. some with more heat than others, I understand; but that’s what summer is all about, at least here in the Tidewater area!  There are a lot of interesting things to report in this issue of the newsletter:

●  Bon Homme Richard search gets underway – quest for sunken ship started July 17th.

●  Historical Flags – flags of the early days of the U.S., including the one John Paul Jones flew during his famous sea-battle with HMS Serapis.

●  Launching – a little over 15 years ago, on May 7, 1991, the USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) was launched in Bath, Maine. A DD-932 shipmate was present.

●  Commissioning - and, 50 years ago this past spring, on April 5, 1956, the USS John Paul Jones (DD-932) was commissioned at the Boston Naval Shipyard. A unique “memory” of that special day is now available.

●  CO’s Column – DDG-53 – “our” ship keeps performing and gathering accolades.

●  New members –  3 “long-lost” shipmates found - it pays to advertise.

●  Sea-Bag -  from cook-book recipes, to ALL HANDS, to VA Cemeteries.

●  Good and Humorous thoughts – we all need to laugh and smile these days.

●  Dramatic photos the April 1942 Doolittle Raid on Japan.

●  Dues Due -   a little “reminder” is enclosed for those who have yet to pay their dues for the

current period (2/06 – 11/07).

Pete Maytham
Secretary

Historical Flags

Betsy Ross Flag

Since there was no official flag during the first year of the United States, there was a great number of homespun flag designs. This flag is without question the most well known of those.

Bonhomme Richard Flag

John Paul Jones raised this Flag on the British frigate Serapis, which he had captured during the most famous Revolutionary naval battle on September 23rd, 1779, when his own ship, the badly damaged Bonhomme Richard, sank.

Grand Union Flag 1775

Also known as the Continental Flag, it is the first true U.S. Flag.  It combined the British King's Colours and the thirteen stripes signifying Colonial unity.  George Washington liked this design so well that he chose it to be flown to celebrate the formation of the Continental Army on New Year's Day, 1776 on Prospect Hill in Somerville near his headquarters at Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Launching of JOHN PAUL JONES DDG-53

Hull 451 (John Paul Jones) slides down the ways at Bath Iron Works, May 7, 1991 DD-932 shipmate, CDR Rich Miner, Jr., USNR (Ret.), at launching of DDG-53

Commissioning USS John Paul Jones (DD-932)

Boston Naval Shipyard – April 5, 1956

John Paul Jones:  “I hoisted with my own hands the flag of freedom the first time it was displayed, on board “Alfred” in the Delaware.”

Commissioning Ceremony CD available For all these 50+ years since that momentous occasion, an audio-tape recording of the ceremony lay forgotten in a metal canister until its recent “re-discovery”. Thanks to the technical skills, efforts and generosity of F. Don Riggs, Jr., son of plankowner, the late YNC Don Riggs, Sr., the audio-tape was resurrected, transferred to CD, and copies sent to DD-932 plankowners. Others wishing to own a copy of the CD may obtain it by sending a check for $10.00 to Don, Jr. at: 711 N. Lucia Ave Ste B, Redondo Beach, CA 90277.

CO’s Column

USS JOHN PAUL JONES (DDG-53)

Happy Summer to our JPJ Association Friends!

True to form, your JPJ Sailors finished up the Spring with another great performance.  We exited the shipyard on May 17th (on time and under budget).  I mentioned to the shipyard team as well as to the other alteration and installation teams that it is always a big accomplishment to exit the shipyard on time and proceed to sea for testing.  While the civilian workers did a great job in helping make that happen, you need to know that it was JPJ Sailors who earned the bulk of the credit. 

We went to sea for 3 days in May putting the ship though her paces and firing our newest weapon system, the CIWS Block 1B.   The first time we pushed the fire button, both mounts worked.  Not only did they work, but they worked very well, adding to our formidable combat capabilities.

During the last two days of the month, we had our major force protection evaluation and scored a perfect 15 out of 15 in our drill scenarios.  This is a significant accomplishment, not only because we passed the test, but because it has immediate applicability to our day-to-day life. 

We also received word that 34 of our Seaman, 3rd class Petty Officers, and 2nd class Petty Officers were selected for advancement to the next paygrade.  That's well over 10% of the crew, which is great. 

June has been a big month for us, and our training and readiness continue to build.  In addition to our own training, we also embarked 15 1st and 2nd class midshipmen from around the country for their summer training cruises.  JPJ Sailors provided superior examples of professionalism and knowledge and helped make their training very useful. 

Our Portland Rose Festival trip was a resounding success.   Everything from the flawless 12 hour river transit into Portland and the 8 hour transit out, to the breakfast and luncheon held aboard for educators and local leaders, to the hundreds of tours given to the general public as well as specially arranged tours went exceedingly well.  Our Sailors visited some very ill children at a local hospital and presented them with JOHN PAUL JONES ballcaps as well as Honorary Sailor certificates.  The children and their parents got a lot out of the visit, and our Sailors did as well.  Our softball team beat every team they played and captured the Rose Festival tournament title.  JPJ Sailors once again stood out as ambassadors of good will and good sportsmanship.  On the trip back down from Portland, our Strike Warfare team earned our certification for cruise missile employment by performing superbly in a tactical qualification trial for Tomahawk missile employment.

After a very brief weekend in port, we departed for Seal Beach, where we spent four days onloading weapons.  The teams functioned smoothly and extremely efficiently in loading over 200 tons of ordnance. 

During this entire period, our engineering department has been training and repairing discrepancies with some very long working hours.  Their efforts are producing results, and our engineering readiness is greatly increasing.

Let me give you a snapshot of the last week of June (26th-30th):  Monday we started our “CIC Team Trainer,” which is built as a 5 to 10 day tactical training session devoted to multiple warfare areas with a lot of people looking at us from the outside.  Built into the CIC Team Trainer is a three-day Fleet Synthetic Training period, which a fiber-optic cable links the ship to a shore facility for interactive training to simulate a fleet battle environment.  We completed the combined two events in 2.5 days and were in the advanced training mode.  An incredible feat.  Also on Monday, we started our two-day Supply Management Certification for Food Service and Supply Support, impressing the inspectors with some vast improvements in our metrics and high sanitation standards.  On Wednesday we conducted our Air Readiness Qualification to certify our flight deck and crew for helicopter operations.  There were no material or administrative discrepancies and the inspectors commented that we ran the best flight deck crash/fire drill they had seen.  Also starting on Monday, we started conducting our Damage Control checks in preparation for our Engineering Unit Level Training and Readiness Assessment (ULTRA-E) that’s coming up the first week of July.  On Thursday we started our 3M (Maintenance and Material Management) Certification.  We certified most of our 3M areas during our 3M Assessment pre-look in February, so they only looked at one area in two departments during the 3MC…you guessed it, we certified with flying colors.  On Friday, we had our Search and Rescue (SAR) pre-look in preparation for our SAR certification later this summer.

Yes, that last paragraph only covers one week (and I didn’t mention an exercise torpedo onload or the warfare syndicate work we were doing or the myriad other things, but you probably get the point).  July won’t slack off either.  It’s a busy time as we prepare to go “In Harm’s Way”.

Sincerely and Very Respectfully,

James J. Housinger
CDR USN

Welcome Aboard …….

Thanks to the Internet, our Website, and some sleuthing, three (3) former DD-932 shipmates are now JPJ Assn. members:

●  Larry Phillips (’57 – ’58) – since 1966, living and teaching in London, England (now semi-retired). Larry and Pete Maytham swapped “sea stories”over dinner in London in May. larry_phillips@msn.com

●  Bob Reynolds (’58 – ’61) – retired lawyer in Indianapolis; active with worldwide assoc. of leading independent law firms. rreynolds@btlaw.com

●  Rich Miner (’58 – ’60) – retired, very successful fund-raiser for Leahy Clinic in Mass., now living in W. Falmouth on Cape Cod. Shipmates Clint Kreitner and Pete Maytham were one of the “surprises” at Rich’s 70th surprise birthday party mid-July.

RichMinerJr@aol.com

IF YOU’RE A “NEW” MEMBER SINCE THE SAN DIEGO REUNION AND YOUR NAME DOESN’T APPEAR HERE, PLEASE CONTACT PETE MAYTHAM (757-357-3785; petermaytham@verizon.net 

Sea-Bag

● Recipes!

THE JOHN PAUL JONES FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP IS MAKING A COOKBOOK AND WE WANT YOUR RECIPES - OR MOM’S, DAD’S, GRANDMA’S, AUNT BESSIE’S AND UNCLE JOHN’S! 

ONCE ALL THE RECIPES ARE COLLECTED WE WILL HAVE THE BOOKS MADE AND AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE.  WHAT A GREAT HOLIDAY GIFT THIS WILL MAKE!

COST OF EACH BOOK IS $10 (PLUS $2 SHIPPING COST PER BOOK IF THE FSG SHIPS THE BOOK FOR YOU).

PLEASE SUBMIT ALL RECIPES TO jpjfsg@yahoo.com.  THE CUT-OFF DATE IS AUGUST 15TH, 2006 – ABSOLUTELY NO RECIPES WILL BE ACCEPTED AFTER AUGUST 15TH!

WHEN YOU SUBMIT YOUR RECIPES, PLEASE ALSO TELL US HOW MANY COOKBOOKS YOU ARE INTERESTED IN BUYING & HOW YOU ARE ASSOCIATED WITH THE USS JOHN PAUL JONES (i.e., CREWMEMBER, FAMILY OR FRIEND OF CREWMEMBER, MEMBER OF JOHN PAUL JONES ASSOCIATION, ETC.).  THIS WAY WE HAVE A BETTER IDEA ON HOW MANY BOOKS TO ORDER & WE CAN IDENTIFY YOU PROPERLY IN THE COOKBOOK.

Good Humor And Thoughts

US Marine Corps Rules

1. Be courteous to everyone, friendly to no one

2. Decide to be aggressive enough, quickly enough.

3. Have a plan.

4. Have a back-up plan, because the first one probably won't work.

5.Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everyone you meet.

6. Do not attend a gunfight with a handgun whose caliber does not start with a "4."

7. Anything worth shooting is worth shooting twice. Ammo is cheap.  Life is expensive.

8. Move away from your attacker. Distance is your friend. (Lateral & diagonal preferred.)

9. Use cover or concealment as much as possible.

10. Flank your adversary when possible. Protect yours.

11. Always cheat; always win. The only unfair fight is the one you lose.

12. In ten years nobody will remember the details of caliber, stance, or tactics. They will only remember who lived.

13. If you are not shooting, you should be communicating your intention to shoot.

Navy SEALS Rules

1. Look very cool in sunglasses.

2. Kill every living thing within view.

3. Adjust Speedo.

4. Check hair in mirror.

US Army Rangers Rules

1. Walk 50 miles wearing 75 pound rucksack while starving.

2. Locate individuals requiring killing.

3. Request permission via radio from "Higher Authority" to perform killing.

4. Curse bitterly when mission is aborted.

5. Walk out 50 miles wearing a 75 pound rucksack while starving.

US Army Rules

1. Select a new beret to wear.

2. Sew patches on right shoulder.

3. Change the color of beret you decide to wear.

US Air Force Rules

1. Have a cocktail.

2. Adjust temperature on air-conditioner.

3. See what's on HBO.

4. Ask "what’s a gunfight?"

5. Request more funding from Congress using a "killer" PowerPoint presentation.

6. Wine & dine 'key' Congressmen, invite DOD & defense industry executives.

7. Receive funding, set up new command and assemble assets.

8. Declare the assets "strategic" and never deploy them operationally.

9. Hurry to make 1345 tee-time.

US Navy Rules

1. Go to Sea.

2. Drink Coffee.

3. Watch movies.

4. Deploy the Marines

80 Men flew from the Hornet on 18 Apr 1942

3 were killed bailing out

8 were captured by the Japanese

3 POWs were executed

1 died of malnutrition and mistreatment

4 were repatriated 40 months into captivity

10 were KIA in Europe, North Africa & Indo-China

4 were shot down and interred as German POWs

As of 21 Dec 05

16 Raiders are still with us.